Thursday, 28 February 2013

Martha Carson - The Rock 'n' Roll Sides

A big thanks to Alan Schrack and Julea Thomerson for their help with this post. 


Now Stop
Music Drives Me Crazy
Dixieland Roll
Just Whistle Or Call

THE ROCK 'N' ROLL SIDE OF MARTHA CARSON


Martha started picking out tunes on a guitar at a real early age and by 10 she was writing her own songs. She was mainly a country singer, excelling in the gospel side of the genre. She recorded for RCA (50's) and Starday/Gusto (70's).

Thank's to PragueFrank for the session details listed below.

MUSIC DRIVES ME CRAZY and DIXIELAND ROLL
Recorded 19 October 1956 at RCA Victor Studio 2, New York City.

Martha Carson - Vocal
George Barnes - Lead Guitar 
Al Chernet - Rhythm Guitar
Charles R. Grean - Bass 
Bunny Shawk - Drums
Bob Davie - Piano + vocal chorus

NOW STOP RCA - JUST WHISTLE OR CALL
Recorded 9 December 1957 RCA Victor Studio, Webster Hall, 125E 11th St., Manhattan, New York City
Martha Carson - Vocal Neal 
George Barnes - Lead Guitar 
Howard Collins - Rhythm Guitar 
Pat Merola - Bass
Bill Cusack Percussion 
Don Lamond Drums 
Lou Stein -Piano
Eugene Lowell, Michael Stewart, Edwin Lindstroem, James Leyden, Jerry Duane, Eugene Steck, Steve Steck, Ray Charles, Allan Sololoff - Vocal Chorus.


The information on Martha below comes from the Hillbilly-Music.com website.

Martha Carson was a native of Neon, KY in Letcher County and enjoyed success seemingly every step of the way in her careers. 
She started picking folk tunes and spirituals on her mail order guitar when she was in grammar school. 
She was even composing hew own songs before she was ten years old. 
Her musical career then took her to singing old-time and gospel songs with her sisters Bertha and Opal; they were known as the Sunshine Sisters and were quite a popular radio act. 
Along came 1939 and while working over at radio station WLAP in Louisville on Asa Martin's "Morning Roundup" show, she met up with James Roberts, a mandolin player who was the son of the legendary fiddler, Doc Roberts. 
They got hitched and began performing together as a duo and moved on to radio station WHIS in Bluefield, WV in 1939.

From there, she moved on to the Renfro Valley Barn Dance in Kentucky and became one of the Coon Creek Girls. 
While a member of the Coon Creek Girls, they went to WSB's Barn Dance in Atlanta, Georgia in 1940. 
At WSB, she and her husband began performing as "James and Martha Carson, the Barn Dance Sweethearts", doing country gospel tunes and were a popular act there for about ten years.

Together, they moved on to Knoxville's WNOX and were part of the noontime "Mid Day Merry-Go-Round" show. 
Martha also appeared on such shows as the Georgia Jubilee, Sunny Side of Life, Mid-day Merry Go Round, Tennessee Barn Dance and others.

In an interesting bit of trivia, her friends said she has never performed in the same costume twice.

A Birmingham station once celebrated "Martha Carson Day" during which they played all of her numbers, and saluted Martha as "...one of the most popular and beloved folk music stars of the country."

In 1951, she was divorced from James. From that point on she pursued a solo career both as a song writer and singer.

In May 1952, Martha answered the invitation to join the famed the Grand Ole Opry heard over WSM in Nashville, TN. While there, she appeared on morning programs, the Opry and weekly on WSM-TV. 
She was also featured nightly for a stint on the Astor Roof.

Martha could sing the country style ballads but was best-known for her religious and gospel tunes. 
A 1947 recording of "The Sweetest Gift" and her husband's "Man of Gallilee" were highly acclaimed. 
Her Opry stint was the result of a rousing popular recording called "Satisfied". 
Another popular tune of hers was "I'm Gonna Walk and Talk With My Lord". 
Her records climbed the charts and were popular on the jukeboxes.

She remained on the Grand Ole Opry until around 1957 when she had remarried and took a 'leave of absence' for the birth of her first child and to attend some commitments in New York. 
But for some reason, never returned to the Opry.


Saturday, 23 February 2013

Billy Wallace and the Bama Drifters

Born 1917 - Died 1978
Billy Wallace was a hillbilly singer/songwriter/guitarist born in Oklahoma but raised in Alabama. Billy's main music was hillbilly/country music, but in 1956 he signed to Mercury records and over two sessions he recorded four rockabilly songs. I've put them together on this home made E.P collection with covers. Find our more about Billy Wallace and his music HERE...


Wednesday, 20 February 2013

How Come It


Mark Lamarr - Gods Juke Box
BBC Radio 2 recorded on 2nd May 2009


A Rockabilly riot - all the way from Alabama, via Luton, courtesy of the Montgomery Music Makers.


Other songs from the show; unfortunately I do not have the MP3's for these.
Pinball Millionaire
Don't Play Around
I Ain't So Bad
Oh Brother

Musicians
Glenn Doran - vocals and lead guitar
Rusty Steel - steel guitar
Garry Doran - rhythm guitar
Ian Finch - double bass

Monday, 18 February 2013

Leanne and the Rockeros


Leanne Rose - Lead Vocal
Laurie Hilton-Ash - Drums
Kevin Dugdale - Steel and Lead Guitar
Mark Beard - Slapping Double Bass
Rich Young - Rhythm Guitar

MANAGER - DAVE MUMBLES
davemumbles@gmail.com


Formed in September 2012 and based in Brighton in the UK, Leanne and the Rockeros are fast making a name for themselves on the rockin' scene in London and the south coast. They have also been signed by Rumble Records, that have a vinyl 45 scheduled to be released in May 1013.



Leanne is obviously a fan of miss Martin (an excellent taste in music) with the Rockeros covering three of Janis's recordings, but have a good listen to the three originals tunes from the set; 'Waiting For The Storm', 'Coast' and the excellent 'Text Book Baby'.

THE LIVE SETLIST FROM STEVE STACK O' WAX RADIO SHOW
COAST
DON'T JUST STAND THERE
HARD TIMES AHEAD
LOVE, LOVE, LOVE
YOUR CHEATING HEART
WAITING FOR THE STORM
GOT A LOT OF RHYTHM IN MY SOUL
LET'S ELOPE BABY
TEXT BOOK BABY
TENNESSEE ROCK N ROLL
LOVE ME TO PIECES


LIKE THEM ON FACEBOOK

ALREADY BOOKED FOR HIGH ROCKABILLY FESTIVAL

Friday, 15 February 2013

the FLEA BOPS

LIVE AT THE QUARRY HOUSE, SILVER SPRING, MARYLAND.
 31st JANUARY 2009
Live songs ripped from daveryte's youtube channel
          • Ronnie Joyner - Vocals/Guitar 
          • Preston LeBeau - Lead Guitar 
          • Wendy LeBeau - Vocals*/Bass
          • Lance LeBeau - Drums
The Set List
HONEY HUSH
DRIVING HOME
TING-A-LING
SO DOGGONE LONESOME
GOTTA BOP*
GET TO GETTIN'
I'M READY
LEND ME YOUR COMB
GOOD TIME WOMAN
TROUBLE IS*
NEVER NO MORE*
I'M A FOOL
I'M COMING HOME
EAGER BEAVER BABY
LONG BLONDE HAIR
BIG RIVER
GLAD ALL OVER
CRACKERJACK*
LOOK AT THAT MOON
MY HEARTS ON FIRE
TOUCH ME
YOUR UNDECIDED
MORSE CODE
GOODBYE GOODBYE
SIXTEEN CHICKS
I'M SORRY, I'M NOT SORRY
SPEED LIMIT
Download here

This is a band that I have loved since I first heard their debut CD 'I'm Ready', this is how I like my rock 'n' roll played...vintage sounding and with feeling. 15 tracks comprising of 6 well done covers with enough Flea Bop input to make them sound fresh, and 9 well written and played originals. And as an extra added bonus to keep the chaps at a Flea Bop show even more happy is the very easy on the eye Wendy LaBeau on double bass and occasional vocals. They have the sound and the look of a traditional rock 'n' roll/rockabilly band, and their vinyl and CD releases on their own Vinylux Record label adds to that feel. In my opinion The Flea Bops are the real deal.

The first CD 2000

The excellent follow up CD 2005

10" Vinyl 2009

45rpm 


video
The above video is from Googah9842 youtube channel

WEBSITES

Buy vinyl and CD recordings here

Monday, 11 February 2013

Glenn Doran and the Montgomery Music Makers


THE MONTGOMERY MUSIC MAKERS
Above picture of Glenn Doran, playing at the Melody Ranch Party, an indoor country festival at the Selma Hotel, Lagerlöf Sunne 25-26 January 2013

Three self penned songs and an excellent cover version of George Jones 'How Come It'. See Glenn and a host of other stars at 'The Rockabilly Rave Ranch Party' the Sunday night finale to the 17th Rockabilly Rave.

The above CD was recorded in 2008 at La Grange recording studio. 
  • Glenn Doran - Guitar
  • Rusty Steel - Steel Guitar
  • Quincy Sloan - Double Bass

The first E.P CD

The article below was first published in Madrat Magazine in 2006
A picturesque thatched pub in the small village of Cotton End, near Bedford, would not normally strike me as a place to find a rockabilly trio playing live. But it was here that I saw a try-out gig from the mysterious 'Montgomery Music Makers'.


Burning The Wind

I was at the 'Rockabilly Rave' when a certain Glenn Doran handed me a C.D. and asked for my opinion on it. I had met Glenn several months earlier while he was playing lead guitar for the now disbanded 'Sliders', a rockabilly cover band.
I had the impression that these must be recordings of his new band. Listening to the C.D. later that night, the first thing that struck me was the sound and then the crackles I was hearing. I was baffled. Had Glenn found some ultra rare recordings from some unknown rockabilly group? Who were 'The Montgomery Music Makers'?
After a significant period of sizzling, Glenn spilled the beans. In the February of 2006, he booked some studio time at the La Grange recording studio. Playing all the instruments he recorded four songs, 'Dry Run', 'Burning the Wind' 'My Heart's on Fire', and 'The Cats Were a-Jumpin', leaving instructions and sample songs for the production as to the sound he was looking for. A week later he got a call saying the recordings were ready and burned to a C.D. But the sound he heard was not what he wanted. So it was back to the studio to find that sound. It did not take long, just a few adjustments at the (so called) mixing desk and the addition of crackles to make the recording sound as if it had been ripped from a 78rpm record. Glenn left the studio with a new C.D. and feeling a whole lot better with the finished recordings.
With rockabilly music when you hear original songs being performed by modern rockin' bands I tend to wonder why at all they bother to cover them. With 'The Montgomery Music Makers' I do not get that feeling. I had not heard Billy Wallace's 'Burning the Wind' since I bought the Mercury Rockabillies L.P. way back in 1979. The reason was a simple one; I was not impressed with it at the time. Thanks to
Glenn, I have been re educated. The four-track C.D. is excellent, but where will he go from there?

I asked him a few questions;
Duke: "What first lead you down the rockabilly path?"
Glenn: "Well, its pretty strange how it all happened really because I was never really shown what it was all about, I can remember my mum and dad playing rockabilly records when I was about 5, which was about 11 years ago and they were playing stuff like Carl Perkins, Hank Williams etc, the list goes on, and I liked it so that's I suppose how it all happened."
Duke: "I first saw you play with the Sliders (now split) last year, you were 15 years old at the time, was this the first band you played in?"
Glenn: "Yeah it sure was, shame it all fell apart really but I suppose if it hadn't I wouldn't have gone on to record under the name of the Montgomery Music Makers."
Duke: "The recordings you posted on 'MySpace' under the name 'The Montgomery Music Makers' made a lot of purists (and still does) believe these were recordings made in the early 1950's. Can you tell us a little info on where, when and who played on those tracks?"
Glenn: "Well to be honest I was getting pissed off with the current rockabilly scene because it wasn't rockabilly, it was all modern sounding material and I wanted to stick up for the roots being (rockabilly) and the reason why everybody loves this music so 'The Montgomery Music Makers' were born. All four (tracks) were recorded at (La Grange) studio at Ley Green in early February of 2006, unfortunately there was no band that recorded it, it was only me I'm afraid. I basically recorded each instrument track over track which consisted of Lead Guitar, Rhythm Guitar, Double
Bass, Vocals, and a bit of 12 string on one of the tracks, but when I done this I then thought I would see if I could trick people into thinking it was original and surprisingly it worked, but thankfully now I've sorted out a band and should be gigging soon. I must add I recommend the recording studio to anyone who wants to achieve an old sound and I owe a big thanks to Boyd and Russell for effort they put in to get the sound you guys hear on the C.D. and 'MySpace', I also thank them for the amount of electricity they spent on the heating trying to keep the studio warm, ha, ha."
Duke: "Those crackles on the tracks were great, were they your idea?"
Glenn: "Well, when I was talking to Boyd and Russell about getting an old sound, they told me about a piece of software they had that creates the sounds of crackles of vinyl, so when I heard that I jumped at the chance because I thought it would be a really good little feature, and that also brought up a lot of interest from people."
Duke: "What does the future hold for Glenn Doran?"
Glenn: "Ha ha, man you make me sound famous, well it’s hard to say really, yes I would like to make something on the rockin' scene, but the whole principle of what I was doing was to bring back proper rockabilly (the roots) and if people liked what they heard on the C.D. then yeah, I'm up for gigging, but the question on my mind is, 'What does the future hold for the Montgomery Music Makers', not just Glenn Doran, because a name is only made with the help of a band."

With a band secured, Glenn emailed me to say they were going to play a try out gig in a small village pub in Bedford, and I knew I had to be there to witness it. So I made the 200 mile round trip. I was told the set list was small; only nine numbers having been deemed presentable at that time. Would they sound anything like the recordings on the C.D? I was not to be disappointed. 'The Montgomery Music Makers' consist of Glenn Doran; vocals and lead guitar, Garry Doran; vocals and rhythm guitar and 19-year-old Quincy Sloan on double bass. Garry was also in the
Sliders, but Quincy was moonlighting from the psychobilly band 'Henry and the Bleeders'. They kicked off the set with Darrell Felts 'Too Much Lovin', and from the opening sound of Glenn's guitar, closely followed by the rhythm and the bass I knew I was going to enjoy this gig. Glenn has a voice that suits rockabilly. He sounds as if he has been picking cotton all day and now was relaxing the best way he knows how, playing music he obviously loves. I have to remind myself at times that the voice belonged to a 16-year-old. The next tune was my favourite from the C.D, 'Dry Run'. To be honest I had never heard the song before and thought it was an original number.
I was later informed some cat called Parker Cunningham recorded the original. John Worthan's 'The Cats Were a-Jumpin' was another stand out number.
Then came a change of singer, Garry took lead vocals on Jimmie Piper's 'Don't Play Around' (I bet his guy does a mean Johnny Cash impersonation).
The trio turned into a duo on the next number 'Burning the Wind'. Garry was back on lead vocals (and wiggly hips) on 'Baby Let's Play House' then it was back to Glenn on vocals on Hank Mizell's 'I'm Ready' and their final song, Junior Thompson's 'Raw Deal'.
Bob Butfoy from 'Jack Rabbit Slim' joined the guys for three songs; 'That's Alright Mama', 'Tear It Up' and 'Shake Em' Up Rock' They were cool, well performed, tunes that filled out the set. I was very impressed and Glenn assures me the set list will get bigger. Choosing the right material is what Glenn is deciding on, he does not want to play the standard set of rockabilly numbers. 'Dry Run' and 'Burning the Wind' are testaments to that.
I feel the 'MontgomeryMusic Makers' need to play to a rockin' crowd. Somewhere like the downstairs stage at the 'Rockabilly Rave' or in the 'Queen Vic' at the same venue would be ideal. It's true that they do covers, but they play the rare ones, and they play them very well.
Greaser Leo from the 'Hillbilly Hop' summed them up when he commented on their 'MySpace' page "Raw…just like we like it", and I have to agree with him.


2nd appearance at the Rockabilly Rave no 13
Photo by FatsGeordiemo


Friday, 8 February 2013

ROCKABILLY RAVE PROGRAMS


ANOTHER COOL THING ABOUT THE ROCKABILLY RAVE IS THE PROGRAMME.

AS SOON AS I CHECK IN (as early as they'll let me in on the Thursday) I GRAB A BEER AND HAVE A CHUCKLE AT THE LETTERS PAGE. IT NOT JUST A PAPER PAMPHLET THAT COULD BE USED AS A BEER COASTER. IT'S WELL DESIGNED (MIGHTY SAM) AND FULL OF INFORMATION ABOUT SHOW TIMES AND EVENTS GOING ON OVER THE WEEKEND. IF ANYONE HAS PROGRAMMES 1-7 THEY CAN SCAN FOR ME THEY'LL GO TO THE TOP OF MY CHRISTMAS CARD LIST! jaustinduke@btinternet.com

DOWNLOAD A JPEG VERSION OF THE 8th PROGRAMME HERE

SCANS HERE

SCANS HERE

SCANS HERE

Scans HERE

Scans HERE

Scans HERE

Scans HERE

Scans HERE

Scans HERE


Monday, 4 February 2013

When Rock 'n' Roll hit Broadway!


Download high resolution scans of the program below

I celebrated my 51st birthday in New York City with my wife and my daughter. It was a four day trip and my second to New York.  The main reason for the trip was to see the show ‘Million Dollar Quartet’ on Broadway with Eddie Clendening in the lead role as Elvis.

Eddie as Elvis 2011
I first met Eddie Clendening at the Rockabilly Rave (UK) in 2004; he was appearing with Deke Dickerson, who was billed at the Rave as introducing Eddie Clendening. After seeing his act and completely digging what I saw and heard, I thought that a return the following year would be a matter of fact. Eddie with his own band and playing a full set...but it was not to be! I am keeping my fingers crossed it will happen soon.

I have seen him on a few occasions since, mainly in London.  And when I heard that he got the part in the show ‘Million Dollar Quartet’ I was glad that his talent was finally getting recognised. I had to see him perform again, so why not New York. I sent an email to make certain Eddie was on the night in question, and he was. He also put me on the box office family and friends list...half price tickets! Cheers Eddie! The show was everything I expected it to be, the musicians keeping with the vintage feel and sound of the era. I think Chuck Mead as musical arranger and supervisor of the show had a lot to do with this.
Singer, guitarist and songwriter Eddie's career in entertainment is on the up. His last CD 'Knocking at Your Heart' is constantly playing whilst I am driving and I am also eagerly awaiting the release of his yet unnamed new CD.



Eddie and Lance Guest Live on 95.5 WPLJ NYC
Download the MP3

Eddie and yours truly outside the Nederlander Theatre 19th February 2011


THE MILLION DOLLAR QUARTET SHOW IS NOW TOURING THE U.S.A AND THE WORLD

Saturday, 2 February 2013

No Stoppin' This Boppin'

THE TUNE ROCKERS

On the Tune Rockers first release 'No Stoppin' This Boppin' the saxophone player is unknown (probably a New York session musician).


Tim Nolan - Bass
Gene Strong - Lead guitar
Vinnie Vincent - Drums
Freddie Patten - Rhythm Guitar

They had success (local) with their second 
(and last) 
release 'Green Mosquito', this was the first big Rock'n'Roll hit out of Buffalo NY (apparently). It was also issued in the UK on the London label. 

Saxophone player Johnny Capello (on Green Mosquito) went on to become lead singer with The Graduates.